“Park ‘n’ Ponder” Lenten Midweek Worship on 3/24: Proclaim

“Park ‘n’ Ponder”

Wednesday, March 24, 2021 • 7:00 p.m.

MVLC Parking Lot

Join us for the final service in our “Park ‘n’ Ponder” series of Lenten midweek drive-in worship services.

On Wednesday 3/24, we explore “Proclaim” through Psalm 136; Romans 10:8-17; a homily from one of MVLC’s pastors, prayers, and songs from the Taizé community.

Things you need to know:

· You arrive in your vehicle. You stay in your vehicle for the duration of the service.

· The service will be approximately 40 minutes long.

· When you arrive, you will check-in and be given a worship folder.

· The service will be broadcast live via an FM transmitter, so you will listen to the service on your car radio. The frequency will be printed in your worship folder.

· Please bring a mask and be prepared to wear it.

· If you roll your car windows down and sing, then you will be required to wear a mask while singing. If you sing with your windows up, then you don’t need to wear a mask.

· The buildings will be locked, so plan ahead. Use the restroom at home! (Restrooms are only available in an emergency.)

“Park ‘n’ Ponder” Lenten Midweek Worship on 3/17: Praise

“Park ‘n’ Ponder”

Wednesday, March 17, 2021 • 7:00 p.m.

MVLC Parking Lot

Join us for our “Park ‘n’ Ponder” series of Lenten midweek drive-in worship services.

On Wednesday 3/17, we explore “Praise” through Psalm 146; Romans 14:7-12; a homily from one of MVLC’s pastors, prayers, and songs from the Taizé community.

Things you need to know:

· You arrive in your vehicle. You stay in your vehicle for the duration of the service.

· The service will be approximately 40 minutes long.

· When you arrive, you will check-in and be given a worship folder.

· The service will be broadcast live via an FM transmitter, so you will listen to the service on your car radio. The frequency will be printed in your worship folder.

· Please bring a mask and be prepared to wear it.

· If you roll your car windows down and sing, then you will be required to wear a mask while singing. If you sing with your windows up, then you don’t need to wear a mask.

· The buildings will be locked, so plan ahead. Use the restroom at home! (Restrooms are only available in an emergency.)

Are you willing to serve as an usher, greeter, communion assistant, or parking attendant? Then please contact Parish Worker Marlene Wright at 253-863-5171 or mwright@mtviewlutheran.org.

“Park ‘n’ Ponder” Lenten Midweek Worship on 3/10: “Pause”

“Park ‘n’ Ponder”

Wednesday, March 10, 2021 • 7:00 p.m.

MVLC Parking Lot

Join us for our “Park ‘n’ Ponder” series of Lenten midweek drive-in worship services.

On Wednesday 3/10, we explore “Pause” through Psalm 46; Habakkuk 2:1-3; a homily from one of MVLC’s pastors, prayers, and songs from the Taizé community.

Things you need to know:

· You arrive in your vehicle. You stay in your vehicle for the duration of the service.

· The service will be approximately 40 minutes long.

· When you arrive, you will check-in and be given a worship folder.

· The service will be broadcast live via an FM transmitter, so you will listen to the service on your car radio. The frequency will be printed in your worship folder.

· Please bring a mask and be prepared to wear it.

· If you roll your car windows down and sing, then you will be required to wear a mask while singing. If you sing with your windows up, then you don’t need to wear a mask.

· The buildings will be locked, so plan ahead. Use the restroom at home! (Restrooms are only available in an emergency.)

Are you willing to serve as an usher, greeter, communion assistant, or parking attendant? Then please contact Parish Worker Marlene Wright at 253-863-5171 or mwright@mtviewlutheran.org.

“Park ‘n’ Ponder” Lenten Midweek Worship on 3/3: Confession

“Park ‘n’ Ponder”

Wednesday, March 3, 2021 • 7:00 p.m.

MVLC Parking Lot

Join us for our “Park ‘n’ Ponder” series of Lenten midweek drive-in worship services.

On Wednesday 3/3, we explore “Confession” through Psalm 73; Romans 7:13b-25; a homily from one of MVLC’s pastors, prayers, and songs from the Taizé community.

Things you need to know:

· You arrive in your vehicle. You stay in your vehicle for the duration of the service.

· The service will be approximately 40 minutes long.

· When you arrive, you will check-in and be given a worship folder.

· The service will be broadcast live via an FM transmitter, so you will listen to the service on your car radio. The frequency will be printed in your worship folder.

· Please bring a mask and be prepared to wear it.

· If you roll your car windows down and sing, then you will be required to wear a mask while singing. If you sing with your windows up, then you don’t need to wear a mask.

· The buildings will be locked, so plan ahead. Use the restroom at home! (Restrooms are only available in an emergency.)

Are you willing to serve as an usher, greeter, communion assistant, or parking attendant? Then please contact Parish Worker Marlene Wright at 253-863-5171 or mwright@mtviewlutheran.org.

“Park ‘n’ Ponder” Lenten Midweek Worship on 2/24: Lament

“Park ‘n’ Ponder”

Wednesday, February 24, 2021 • 7:00 p.m.

MVLC Parking Lot

Join us for our “Park ‘n’ Ponder” series of Lenten midweek drive-in worship services.

On Wednesday 2/24, we explore “Lament” through Psalm 38:9-22; Matthew 5:1-11; a homily from one of MVLC’s pastors, prayers, and songs from the Taizé community.

Things you need to know:

· You arrive in your vehicle. You stay in your vehicle for the duration of the service.

· The service will be approximately 40 minutes long.

· When you arrive, you will check-in and be given a worship folder.

· The service will be broadcast live via an FM transmitter, so you will listen to the service on your car radio. The frequency will be printed in your worship folder.

· Please bring a mask and be prepared to wear it.

· If you roll your car windows down and sing, then you will be required to wear a mask while singing. If you sing with your windows up, then you don’t need to wear a mask.

· The buildings will be locked, so plan ahead. Use the restroom at home! (Restrooms are only available in an emergency.)

Are you willing to serve as an usher, greeter, communion assistant, or parking attendant? Then please contact Parish Worker Marlene Wright at 253-863-5171 or mwright@mtviewlutheran.org.

Lent & Rock Ministry

Lent Discipleship Kits

Rock Ministry children and youth received Lent Kits (pictured) this week.

  • Families with young children received a mid-week Lent devotional and new items for their @home altars.
  • Middle Rock youth received materials for weekly online gatherings, including charcoal for charcoal art that Ken Swanson will be teaching them as we begin Lent.
  • High school youth received a Discipleship Box: each item they take out has a devotional or spiritual practice to try.

Thanks to the delivery team for getting out these kits despite the looming snow!

+

Lenten Devotions for Rock Ministry

Rock Ministry continues to reimagine how to stay connected to the children, youth, and families of MVLC.

Here are digital versions of some of the Rock Ministry items that are making their ways into homes.

Even if you don’t have kids in Rock Ministry, you are invited to use these materials, especially the soup recipes.

► View the “We Come to the Hungry Feast” Lenten devotional for elementary kids HERE.

► View the Lenten soup recipes HERE.

► View the Middle Rock Lent Challenge HERE.

► View the various “Mt. View Epistles” (2020) and “Rock Ministry Lessons” (2021) HERE.

Lenten Daily Devotional • 04/08/2020

Devotion by Carol Powers, President of the Congregation.

Read Acts 9:1-22.

In this season of Lent, we’ve heard devotions on vocation as it relates to our station in life. I want to explore this idea in more depth and relate some of my own personal experience of how the two intertwine.

I spent the first 25 years of my work life (station) in support roles. From Secretary to Administrative Assistant to Executive Assistant, my job was largely supporting and executing other decision makers’ work. Although this work had its rewarding moments and I made some lifelong friendships along the way, after reaching the “top” of the administrative support ranks, I found myself with daily frustration. My station had become very boring to me. I think it’s important to note this lack of fulfillment in my work led to other problems. Daily droning after work to my husband about the unhappiness of the day, reduced self-esteem from not feeling worthy of other jobs, and frankly a pretty healthy pity party focused on myself. As Ananias was doubtful of how Saul could be of any help to the Kingdom of God, I was doubtful that I could make a change in my life that could be significant.

Nevertheless, like Saul’s experience of moving from a place that felt dark and empty, God had plans for my life and it was going to change my station and vocation in many ways.

There is a clear picture in my mind the night Craig said to me stop griping about work and do something about it! There were words like, “I can’t,” “I’m too old,” “the kids are too young,” – I had all the reasons it wouldn’t work. But I really think God was in our midst that night to encourage me to try a new station (occupation) in life, one I had been drawn to for a long time. It was that night I decided to return to school to just try out engineering and see if I could actually become a civil engineer.

Returning to school with a full-time job and a young family was not easy and it took about 7 years to finish the classes I needed.  As the long nights of studying persisted and the kids were growing up, I was pretty bummed about how long it was taking. The scales didn’t fall off my eyes like Paul and immediately a new life was bestowed. It was more of a journey (a slog at times), but one the Lord had His hand in all along the way.

We moved churches and started attending Mountain View during this time and went from being fairly passive church goers, to feeling the call of discipleship, greater involvement, and growing our tithes. The Mountain View community embraced us and offered words of support and encouragement each time we gathered. Pastor John was also instrumental in building my confidence and identifying that serving at church as a leader was likely part of my vocation, which I had never considered before.

And I learned the station I had chosen, engineering, is an occupation of service as well. (I thought it was just math!) Consider the Oath of the Engineer:

I am an Engineer. In my profession, I take deep pride. To it, I owe solemn obligations.

As an engineer, I pledge to practice integrity and fair dealing, tolerance and respect, and to uphold devotion to the standards and dignity of my profession. I will always be conscious that my skill carries with it the obligation to serve humanity by making the best use of the Earth’s precious wealth.

As an engineer, I shall participate in none but honest enterprises. When needed, my skill and knowledge shall be given, without reservation, for the public good. In the performance of duty, and in fidelity to my profession, I shall give my utmost.

The 7 years I had previously lamented about were starting to make sense. God was working in me and through those around me to reveal this new station in life overlaid with vocation of serving the neighbor.  Maybe my transition wasn’t as dramatic or fast as Paul’s, but I do think sometimes we have to make changes in our own lives to live out vocation. When I look back at the time of my old career, my focus was inward, “how do I get through another day.” As I finished school, it became clear to me, even desirable to embrace serving community, the church and the neighbor.

My hope is this testimony of station and vocation provides some insight into this important topic that affects all of us on a daily basis. I’m thankful God opened my eyes and gave me the strength to make changes that create more possibilities for living into vocation for the sake of the neighbor. And the journey continues… I’m thankful for the love and support I receive daily from my family, friends, and brothers and sisters in Christ at Mountain View.

Image: “Ananias Restoring the Sight of Saint Paul,” 1631, by Pietro de Cortona.

Lenten Daily Devotional • 04/06/2020

Hello everyone, my name is Susan Bloomfield and I’m the Director of Music Ministries here at Mountain View.  Today’s devotion for Monday, April 6 is the story of the Flood from the Easter Vigil liturgy.

Possibly no other story in the Bible carries as much dogmatic baggage as the Flood.  We hear in Genesis chapters 6-9 how God told Noah to build an ark, gather 2 of every animal and bird, and shut in himself in the ark with his entire family.  We are told that God sent rain for 40 days, wiping out every living thing from the face of the earth because “…[Noah] you alone are righteous before me in this generation.”

I think the story of the flood is so much more than God being angry with the sinfulness of humanity and killing every living thing on earth to start over again from scratch.  As scholars from BioLogos state, “The story of Noah, the Ark, and Flood speaks an inspired and powerful message about judgment and grace, that has instructed God’s people throughout the ages about God’s hatred of sin and his love for his creation. Most importantly, we see God’s promise never to destroy the Earth again fully realized in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, where God takes the judgment for sin upon himself rather than humanity. Thus, through the lens of Christ, the biblical Flood story proclaims the marvelous news of God’s grace and love for his people.” (https://biologos.org/common-questions/how-should-we-interpret-the-genesis-flood-account/)

Another aspect of the flood story that directly relates to our life today is that when Noah and his family were in a time of crisis they turned to God for help.  The ark can be seen a physical representation of the shelter God provides us in times of trouble.  Genesis 7:17-18 says, “The flood continued forty days on the earth; and the waters increased, and bore up the ark, and it rose high above the earth.  The waters swelled and increased greatly on the earth; and the ark floated on the face of the waters.”

We all know what it feels like to feel tossed and turned, and, in this time of surrealism, to feel completely ungrounded.  The story of the flood reminds us, that, even when there is no ground to stand upon, we can rest in the protection of God (even if we’re cooped up with our spouses, children, and pets!).

Additionally, the traditional response to the story of the Flood at Easter Vigil is Psalm 46 (which the hymn, “A Mighty Fortress” is based upon).  We hear, “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.  Therefore we will not fear, though the earth should change, though the mountains shake in the heart of the sea; though its waters roar and foam, though the mountains tremble with its tumult.  ‘Be still, and know that I am God!  I am exalted among the nations, I am exalted in the earth.’  The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge.”  (Psalm 46:1-3, 10-11)

Let us pray:

Almighty God, you have placed in the skies the sign of your covenant with all living things: Grant that we, who are saved through water and the Spirit, may worthily offer to you our sacrifice of thanksgiving; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Watch this related video: https://youtu.be/E47ZBwT4MUc

Image: 12th-century depiction of Noah sending the dove. Mosaic, Basilica di San Marco, Venice.

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑